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Although this could very well be a picture of me finding a new treasure at a favorite nursery, it's actually an illustration by David Catrow for a children's book called Plantzilla.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day June 2017

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day is hosted on the fifteenth of each month by the fabulous Carol at May Dreams Gardens.  Click here to see what's blooming all over the world this month.

June in pacific northwest gardens is a floral fiesta!  Here's some of what I saw when I went out on Wednesday morning to snap some pictures.

"Oh my luve's like a red, red rose that's newly sprung in June" goes the Robert Burns poem and, although I'm not much of a rosarian, there seem to be a number of them blooming in my garden right now.  Following are just some of them.  I've forgotten most of their names.


'Betty Boop'

Blurry 'Fragrant Cloud' is really more orange. than what the picture shows. 

'Zephirine Drouhin'

'Westerland'

Knock Out 





Double impatiens.  Love these as they happily winter in the greenhouse and root easily from cuttings. They're also darned cute.

Sambucus nigra 'Black Lace'

One of the several abutilons that spent the winter in the greenhouse fighting off whitefly and aphids.

Crinodendron hookerianum of which I can never get a good picture. 

The last of the Bleeding Hearts for this season. 

Martagon lily

A native lily that likes growing in damp places.  

Clematis



Martha Washington Geranium (a pelargonum of some sort.)

You may be wondering about all of those begonias crowded into the little glass room.  The season's first blooms have started.







Another Pelargonum (Geranium) with interesting flowers. 

Parahebe perfoliata

Meconopsis somethingorother

Fuchsia

First Calla lily with Calycanthus floridus 'Hartlage wine'.  The Sinocalycanthus chinensis above is also blooming.

Kolkwitzia amabilis now has a new name - Linnaea amabilis

 Lonicera periclymenum  'Sweet Tea' 

Abutilon vitifolium is hardy in the ground here which is fortunate as it's already about 15 feet tall. 

Magnolia macrophylla

Bunch of stuff in the parking strip.


Fremontodendron 

Why, oh why did I ever let this set up shop in the parking strip?  Chamerion angustifolium is native and requires no care other than to pull it up where you don't want it.  It likes to spread everywhere.

Argyrocytisus battandieri (Pineapple Broom) really does smell like pineapple.

Symphytum × uplandicum 'Axminster Gold'

Amsonia

Aesculus indica or Indian Horse Chestnut.  The flowers are a bit more pink and the green bit around the conkers is smooth, resembling figs.

Artemisia sort of thing that came from Dig via Xera.  Lovely little blooms and the buds are adorable.

Penstemon  'Electric Blue'

Kalmia latifolia

Deutzia 'Monzia'

Threatening to take over.

Carpenteria californica

Thanks, Carol for hosting the monthly florapalooza!  

37 comments:

  1. So many gorgeous flowers!! I love your Sambucus. I planted one three years ago, but it is still piddly, probably because it doesn't get enough water. And fireweed!! I used to live in Alaska when I was a kid, and we had lots of fireweed, so that picture of yours brings me back!

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    1. I also grew up in Alaska and that's the reason, when the fireweed decided to move in, it didn't get pulled out immediately.

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  2. So many stunning plants in bloom in your garden but that pink horse chestnut takes the cake.

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    1. It's really very pretty and the flowers look a bit like orchids when viewed up close.

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  3. Astonishing collection, Peter. I see the native Fireweed on my walks and thought of taking some seeds home with me... I thank you for the warning.
    I bought Amsonia last year not only for it's lacy look, but I loved the name: "Half way to Arkansas"; apparently Amsonia Arkansas is the larger specimen.

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    1. Fireweed isn't really that difficult to control but it does spread around quite a bit.

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  4. Where do you put it all!? Your mystery artemisia might be Senecio leucostachys aka S. viravira. Love that plant. But OMG meconopsis and martagon and that hardy abutilon -- which I love but can't grow, not enough chill -- broom, horse chestnut, and that explosive deutzia. Unbelievably gorgeous. Wonderful June garden, Peter.

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    1. There's this giant shoehorn that helps me cram things into every available inch of soil. It's become a bit Darwinian out there; some things just can't take the competition. Thanks for the I.D. You're absolutely right!

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  5. It's a bloomiferous party in your garden...wow! So many lovely plants that are obviously very happy.

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    1. The unhappy customers just don't get photographed.

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  6. Ha! I forgot to take a photo of my Magnolia macrophylla...what was I thinking. Poor Clifford, his month to shine and I ignore him.

    Gorgeous going on here Peter!

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    1. Oh no, not Clifford neglect. It's funny, when I look out my back door or walk in from the front there's only foliage visible. Bloom Day always surprises me when I find so many blooms.

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  7. So many beautiful things I wish I could grow!

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    1. Have you considered a move to the PNW?

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  8. There is one enormous bud swelling on my Magnolia macrophylla in the front bed by the street, it will probably open and fade next week while I'm away at the Fling. There are no flowers yet on my tuberous Begonias, but I only just potted them up into bigger pots with some flowerific organic fertilizer. Hoping they respond. I did one tuber per pot, is that what you do?

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    1. Hooray for your Magnolia macrophylla blooming, even in your absence. Yes, one tuber per pot. People who grow them for exhibition only allow one stem to grow but I let them get as bushy as they want to. Have fun at the Fling!

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  9. Geez, add some color to your garden! ;)
    I imagine that it smells quite amazing there, and your neighbors benefit too.

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    1. Good idea. Wouldn't want it to be to bland out there:)

      I must remind my neighbor of that next time I do my bamboo shoot patrol in her garden. Must dig trenches this summer!

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  10. When you hold a floral fiesta you don't fool around! All those roses - and clematis and begonias too! And I'm swooning over the Deutzia.

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    1. June is magic in our gardens. Deutzia does well with little care.

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  11. So much to see! I had to scroll through twice. Needless to say I have zone envy. So many of these plants would never grow in our hot climate.

    And when I saw that Meconopsis, I almost fell over (OK, I was sitting in my chair). I have yet to see one in person and want to so badly. Whenever I'm in Victoria, BC, there never in bloom.

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    1. When I see all of your gorgeous succulents and cacti growing happily in the ground I'm also a bit envious. Funny how the grass always seems greener in someone else's climate.

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  12. Needless to say, I loved your roses, but you have a fabulous collection. Nothing like a Zone 8 climate. Too bad you can't share just a little.

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    1. Having grown up and gardened in zone 3, this feels like paradise. Have you ever considered a move west?

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  13. OMG! How did you get the Meconopsis to bloom? I was just at the Rhododendron Botanical Garden in Federal Way to see them but am too afraid to buy one. Also that grey-purple clematis is a beauty where did you get that?

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    1. I was once told that it's important to get Meconopsis in the ground by May. They like our climate and this one, 'Lingholm,' has been a reliable bloomer and has increased to a nice clump and seeded about a bit. I don't remember where that grey-purple clematis came from. It's been in that spot for several years.

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  14. There is a lot blooming in your garden. I have failed at mecanopolis (?) I always figured it was too hot and dry here. I am amazed you can grow it. It looks great.Happy GBBD.

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    1. Meconopsis likes the cool summers and wet winters in the Pacific Northwest. The grow even more beautifully in Alaska. Cold doesn't bother them but it doesn't like it very hot and dry.

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  15. Oh my gosh, I'm in awe of all of the beauty you have growing in your gardens. Just wonderful!!!!!!

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    1. Thank you! It's nothing like your tropical paradise but we can grow a wide range of plants in our climate.

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  16. I did not know that they had changed the name of Kolkwitzia. I loved that shrub in our old garden. I am not sure if I can fit it into the new one. Love that pineapple flower! And the roses, of course!

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    1. I bet you could squeeze in a Kolkwitzia somewhere. They do get pretty large but don't mind a bit of pruning. What a beautiful bush.

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  17. I didn't realize you had so many roses! I tried to grow Westerland but it came down with rose rosette disease and I had to get rid of it. That blue Penstemon is definitely fantastic.

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    1. I brought 'Sally Holmes' back from the nursery and thought of your post which prompted me to think again about this beauty!

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  18. Peter, where did you get your Abutilon vitifolium? that is just simply spectacular! I have been recently looking for one without any luck. do you recall?

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    1. I got it several years ago but have forgotten where. It sometimes shows up in local nurseries. Try calling Cistus, Joy Creek, (both in Oregon but they do mail order) Willow Tree Gardens, Vassey, Windmill, Wells Medina, Swansons, Sky to see if they have or can get it for you. I don't know if it roots very well but if you're in the area, I'd be happy to share a cutting with you.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to comment! I love to hear your thoughts.